Is European Spanish similar enough to Latin American?

The question of how similar European Spanish is to Latin American variations comes up quite often. Customers approach a translation company or translator and they may, at times, be asked the same question. So what is the answer? Let me turn the question on its head and ask it in a way you the reader may understand. Imagine you have a brochure or document to be translated in English and you are asked UK or US English? Would you write a different brochure or document for another English speaking country? Wait a minute people say! Latin American Spanish differs a little from European Spanish, true, but so does UK English from US English, for example, honor and honour, color and colour, potato and potato (slightly different pronunciation), pavement and sidewalk, etc. Would you have a film made in Australia or the US dubbed into English UK, the answer is no. It is the same in the Spanish speaking world, a film made in Spain can be shown in its original format to audiences in Latin America and vice versa. Literature interchange also takes place within the Spanish speaking world without having to make any changes. Commerce and other activities take place between Spain and Spanish speaking countries, and a Spanish speaking person travelling to any other Spanish speaking country will not require the services of an interpreter or even a translator. The Spanish language is regulated by the Real Academia Española (Spanish Royal Academy). All Spanish speaking countries have a Real Academia Española, and together they regulate the Spanish language – there are not two different Spanish Languages just like there are not two English Languages. Natural variations in language usage occur between cities and regions in England and in Spain, and even between cities and villages in the same region. Would you really like your brochure or document translated into Yorkshire or Derbyshire English? Some Latin American countries use the seseo for the spoken word (pronouncing the letter c as s), this also happens in some Spanish regions, particularly Andalusia and the Canary Islands, however, the written word does not change. You see, people have accents, even within the same country, but the written word doesn’t. In summary, will a Spanish person or company from Spain require the services of a translator or interpreter to communicate with another person or company from any other Spanish speaking country? The answer is invariably no, and...

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